Horse Injuries Are Stressful And Therapy Choices Can Be Confusing

Horse injuries frustrate us all. Your equine friend is lame, now what? Can you identify the specific problem and the right equine therapies to make it better… and fast? Are you unsure of the best way to proceed?

Gladstone Equine collects and brings you the most current and complete research we can find on horse injuries as well as a wide range of cutting-edge treatment options. We’re not veterinarians; we’re regular horse people just like you, constantly seeking the best treatments for our horses.

Browse this post to learn the causes and symptoms of many common training injuries and other physical problems. Dip into our accumulated information on equine massage, chiropractors, acupuncture, acupressure, LEPT therapy, and other natural remedies. We have our favorites, and we won’t hesitate to recommend them, but we’re also open-minded and want your feedback and advice. We promise that we’ll only promote therapies supported by real science.

Common Horse Injuries

Horse injuries are stressful for both the horse and the horse owner. We concentrate here on common injuries and ailments that result from training stress, trauma, and environmental conditions.

The first thing to remember is that no treatment for your horse’s injury is complete without the assessment of a good veterinarian. We have found that there are many effective alternative treatments and therapies, but none are a substitute for a trained veterinarian.

We can’t stress this point enough. We hear all the time about the disagreements between traditional vets and alternative practitioners. There is no need for argument. The best and most progressive vets in the country include chiropractic, acupuncture, and LEPT as a key components of complete equine care.

Every horse owner should also have a quality reference manual on veterinary horse care, and no stable should be without a comprehensive anatomical wall chart. Gladstone Equine’s Library includes a number of good reference books and both general and specific anatomical charts. Finally, visit our affiliate partner StateLineTack.com to find a selection of basic horse health care products for your barn or stable.

Here are the horse injuries and conditions that we address. We’ve collected information for you from many sources. Click on the text link and you’ll be presented with our feature article, which includes an explanation of the condition and treatment suggestions, followed by sources of additional information.

We hope you find these insights useful, and we welcome your comments, anecdotes and most of all, your experiences with the suggested remedies and others that you’ve found valuable.

  • Bowed Tendon: A form of tendonitis resulting from surface conditions, trauma, or overtraining.
  • Cold Backed Horses: Does your horse flinch every time you put your saddle on him?
  • Colic: The number one killer of horses.
  • Foot Injuries: Cracks, thrush, bruises and more.
  • Founder: In the seafaring world, founder means “To Sink.” What is it and what can you do?
  • Hock Conditions and Injuries: Caps, fractures, luxations and spavins.
  • Lacerations: Open wounds can be among the most traumatic injuries for the horse and owner.
  • Lameness: General lameness is a condition that every horse owner confronts eventually. Learn how to identify and isolate causes of leg pain.
  • Laminitis: Extremely painful condition frequently caused by grain overload
  • Navicular Syndrome: A poorly understood problem, but we’ve collected good information for you.
  • Poll Trauma: If you use a halter and tie your horse, your horse has this injury. Learn what it is and what you can do.
  • Rain Rot: Another disease, but so common we need to address it.

Equine Therapies

A wide array of Equine Therapies are available from any progressive veterinary practice as well as through independent practitioners.

Since horse injuries and ailments are stressful for both the horse and the horse owner, today’s horse enthusiast is constantly seeking new alternative equine therapies. Gladstone Equine concentrates here on alternative therapies to relieve injuries and ailments that result from training stress, trauma, and environmental conditions.

The first thing to remember is that all equine therapies should include the assessment of a good veterinarian. We have found that there are many effective alternative treatments and therapies, but none are a substitute for a trained veterinarian.

We can’t stress this point enough. We hear all the time about the disagreements between traditional vets and alternative practitioners. There is no need for argument. The best and most progressive vets in the country include chiropractic, acupuncture, and LEPT as key components of complete equine care.

Every horse owner should also have a quality reference manual on veterinary horse care, and no stable should be without a comprehensive anatomical wall chart. Gladstone Equine’s Library includes a number of good reference books and both general and specific anatomical charts. Finally, visit our affiliate partner State Line Tack to find basic horse health care supplies like leg wraps, dressings and routine medications.

Here are the alternative equine therapies that we address. We’ve collected information for you from many sources.

Click on the text link and you’ll be presented with Gladstone Equine’s feature article, which includes an explanation of the therapy, followed by sources of additional information and practitioners.

We hope you find these insights useful, and we welcome your comments, anecdotes and most of all, your experiences with the suggested remedies and others that you’ve found valuable.

  • Acupuncture & Acupressure: Widely practiced, these therapies originate in Traditional Chinese Medicine.
  • Blistering and Pin Firing: Barbaric old school tactics
  • Equine Chiropractic: A new tool available to the horse owner.
  • Equine Hydrotherapy: Equine Spas have spread to North America
  • Equine Massage Some therapists are well-trained; others are not. Know how to tell the difference
  • Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: Studies imply success in treating bone and tendon injuries.
  • Magnetic Therapy: Poorly understood, but does it work?
  • Low Energy Photo Therapy (LEPT): Ancient Greeks knew that light had the power to heal. Also known as Low
  • Energy Photo Therapy, it’s mainstream again.